playing with library instruction

I’m a big fan of automating what we can in our work (or at least my work) to free up more time for the experimental cutting edge stuff. Luckily I work with some experimental faculty who don’t necessarily want to put class time into library instruction. Recently I had a pair of co-teachers ask for an online tutorial covering several specific skills, so I made them this:

A library instruction session on the web.

It’s not as polished as I’d like, but it’s what they asked for, and it was made very quickly (so it met their needs). And my favorite part is that it provides more content for the Toolkit. Some content came from the Toolkit, some was created specifically for the class and will be added to the Toolkit.

I’d love some feedback if you’re willing to give it!

5 thoughts on “playing with library instruction

  1. I like it Lauren. I can’t tell which screencasting tool you’re using, but if Camtasia you could also go for a menu as in http://www.ucalgary.ca/lib-old/libcon/links/ (sorely in need of updating). Camtasia Studio 5 also allows you to pan and zoom automatically, good for showing URLs and such… You might also consider hosting somewhere other than YouTube to aid in readability – I like Viddler.com because it doesn’t compress nearly as much, thus rendering the videos much more legible.

  2. Thanks Paul! The site actually had examples from several different screencasting tools we’ve experimented with. Thanks for the advice on Camtasia 5. I need to upgrade.

    Also great tip about Viddler.com. We intentionally chose YouTube for the findablity factor, but there’s nothing to say we can’t post material in a different location for embedding as well. I’ll be sure to look into it.

    Great recommendations!

  3. I’m experimenting with screencasting and am struggling with how sterile it can feel. Any ideas about how librarians can communicate authenticity through video?

  4. Hi, Jason. Isn’t that the question! I’m a fan of more conversational and less scripted, but I don’t (yet) have evidence that that method communicates authenticity. Are you having any luck?

  5. Pingback: Point of Need Teaching, in a Database, to Make all of Our Lives Easier | lauren's library blog

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